The Fall of Russia’s Askold

Christian Baghai
3 min readNov 8, 2023

The reported destruction of Russia’s modern warship, the Askold, by a Ukrainian-launched Storm Shadow missile sends a seismic wave across the strategic landscape of the Black Sea. This operation, executed with precision and shrewdness, is not merely a tactical incident; it’s a resonant symbol of Ukraine’s resilient defiance and the tangible vulnerabilities in Russian maritime might. The Storm Shadow is a long-range, air-launched cruise missile with stealth capabilities, jointly developed by the UK and France, which is typically launched from the air1. It can be operated in extreme conditions in both day and night, offering deep-strike capability with a firing range in excess of 250 kilometers (155 miles). Its successful use by Ukraine indicates not only a qualitative leap in its offensive capabilities but also signifies potent international backing that could be shaping the conflict’s trajectory.

At a price tag of $34 million, the Askold was not just a financial investment but also a statement of military modernization and power projection by Russia. That such a vessel, which had barely entered service, has been incapacitated is telling of the multifaceted challenges that the Russian navy now confronts. The Askold, meant to be a predator on the high seas, fell prey to an advanced weapon system designed to level the playing field by striking deep and hard into the heart of enemy capabilities.

The Storm Shadow missile, a product of Franco-British defense collaboration, encapsulates European technological prowess. A silent and deadly hunter of the skies, the Storm Shadow represents a class of weaponry that redefines the contours of engagement, making geographical depth less of a sanctuary for military assets. Its successful use by Ukraine indicates not only a qualitative leap in its offensive capabilities but also signifies potent international backing that could be shaping the conflict’s trajectory.

Turning to the Karakurt-class corvette Askold, we are reminded of its conceived role — a nimble guardian of Russia’s naval interests, wielding Kalibr or Oniks missiles to project power and deterrence. Its loss, thus, is not merely one of metal and munitions but one that pierces the narrative of invincibility that often shrouds great powers. The symbolism is stark; the vessel, purposed for dominance, laid low in the waters it was…

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